Anthropologie’s (Too Cute to Be Just) Dishtowels

Anthropologie dishtowels

Cotton dishtowels, 28″ long by 21″ wide, from Anthropologie.

 

Dacia Ray shares a great idea for making the most of Anthropologie’s dishtowels, which might be too precious to use for their intended purpose. Try repurposing the dishtowels to use as a sewing machine cover like the one shown at Dacia Ray, or maybe as a pillow or for decorating a child’s room. Many of the dishtowels have cute appliques or embroidery so they would be perfect for kids.

Liberty Fabrics at J.Crew

J.Crew stores are full of Liberty fabrics right now. The soft, lightweight Liberty cotton comes in so many different prints, so which ones did J.Crew choose to use? Here they are:

Use Liberty fabrics for all sorts of DIY projects, just like J. Crew has done this season.

Use Liberty fabrics for all sorts of DIY projects, just like J. Crew has done this season.

 

They’ve used the flowery prints on shirts, a skirt, a makeup bag and kids clothes (really, they are all over the store). You can find the same fabrics yourself, along with other Liberty prints, at intfab.com (which has the red and pink fabric and the navy fabric) and fabricsandbuttons.com (which has the lime and periwinkle fabric).

Fabric Guide: Japanese Tenugui

Tenugui

Assorted 1 ft (30 cm) by 3 ft (91 cm) tenugui cloths available at Tortoise.

Sunday’s New York Times features girls’ dresses in adorable brightly-colored prints from Japanese brand Noko. The dresses are made from a hand-dyed cotton gauze fabric called tenugui, traditionally used as a hand towel or handkerchief in Japan. [NY Times]

With modern colorful patterns, like these at Tortoise, tenugui work not only for children’s clothes, but for headbands, napkins, placemats and other accessories as well.